Excerpts from the article:
A Word from Ed, Fred, W.H.H.

from The Daily Republican, 26 October, 1909
Steamer Quincy, Taft Flotilla.
Special Correspondence.
"I’ll tell you, Regenhardt, this has been the prettiest picture I’ve seen on my whole trip."
"Governor, your state can certainly "show us.’ "
These two sentences were the starter of what President Taft had to say on his ride back to his boat after his speech at the Normal.
"There never was a prettier morning than this and the fine view at the great school was beyond description. I have reason never to forget Missouri, and I also have reason to always remember Cape Girardeau." This was by no means all that the President said to Mr. Regenhardt, but it serves to show that the efforts to please the distinguished party were most successful.
Those congressmen who went to the Normal and got a view of the Cape are loud in their praise of our city, and we three "Capians" are indeed proud to have on our Cape badges. Nearly all other men on the boat are decorated with our badges and those who haven’t them tried to get them.
It wasn’t fifteen minutes after our boat left the wharf until "Uncle Joe" Cannon
left the breakfast table and came to the front of the boat where we three were huddled around the stove. The distinguished old "standpatter" recognized "Big Ed" at once and when he yelled out, "Why, hello, "Big Ed,’ how you been?" we thought the boat gave a few more trumbles…..
…..The Steamer Quincy is said to be one of the finest boats on the river. We have 227 guests on board. Mr. Harrison and myself have an elaborate state room in the Texas. It will be necessary for us to retire one at a time and then it may be necessary to use the shadows from the rear end of the pilot house for a dressing place. "Bib Ed" has been located in a "stall" of the main cabin. The clerk said it would be necessary for all rooms to be occupied by two men, but when President Kavanaugh
presented the big fellow at the desk, the clerk declared that he would easily count for two, so he will "bunk" alone.

Excerpts from the article:
Aftermath of Taft Day Finds All Pleased with Celebration
from The Daily Republican, 27 October, 1909
When President Taft finished planting the tree at the Normal campus yesterday, Mrs. Edw. F. Regenhardt was introduced to him by Mr. Regenhardt. Mrs. Regenhardt had an infant son, born during the presidential campaign last year. Mr. Taft kissed the boy when he heard Mr. Regenhardt named him after the President.


Excerpts from the article:
A Word from Ed, Fred, W.H.H.
from The Daily Republican, 28 October, 1909
Steamer Quincy, Taft Flotilla.
Special Correspondence.
Judge Charles Gallenkamp, surveyor of the port at St. Louis, is in charge of our boat. He is a lifelong friend of "Big Ed" and this evening conferred a special favor upon our leader. Anyone who has ever traveled on a steamboat knows that the "bunks" are no larger than they ought to be. On the Quincy they are probably six feet long, and as Mr. Regenhardt measures about 6 feet 5 inches when he stretches out, it was necessary for Judge Gallenkamp to provide special accommodations. So he had a transom loosened and if desired our distinguished citizen will be allowed to hang his feet through the hole over the door.