Rob's Genealogy
You are currently anonymous Log In
 

Notes


Tree:  

Matches 101 to 150 of 3,384

      «Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 68» Next»

 #   Notes   Linked to 
101 !OBITUARY
DIED AT VULCAN
Hrs. Matilda Elizabeth Clifford, 80, died at the hoie of her daughter, Mrs. Perry Sutton at Vulcan, Septeiber I5. She is the widow of the late James
Clifford. Services on Septeiber I5, were froi the Sutton Ceietery at 3 p.m. with the Rev. Drew Seal in charge. Burial was there with White and Sons
service.
(THE MOUNTAIN ECHO newspaper...Ironton, Iron county, NO...Septeiber 22, 1949)

Research notes courtesy of Linda E. Lewis, “George Lewis Descendants”, published October 1992.


 
Ruble, Malinda Elizabeth (I58802284)
 
102 !OBITUARY
FORMER JUDGE OF COUNTY COURT PASSES AWAY

William Tyler Keathley was born near Annapolis August 3, 1870, and died June 18, 1953, aged 82 years, 10 months and 15 days.

He was united in marriage to Martha Evaline Lewis on February 19, 1892, and to this union thirteen children were born. His wife and 11 children survive his. The living children are:

Della Tesreau, St. Louis; Walker Keathely, Ironton, Lucille Fanali, Point Arena, California; Nettie Helms, Hamburg, Michigan; Levter Keathley, St. Louis; Charles E. of San Gabriel, California; Clarence of Jefferson City; Herschel of Anchorage, Alaska; Myrene Wallace of Ironton; Lorene Keathely of Ironton; Marshall Keathley of Midland, Texas.

He also leaves 27 grandchildren and 22 great grandchildren to honor his memory.

At an early age he became a member of the Christian Church at Brunot. Later he united with the First Baptist Church here at Ironton.

During his entire life he practiced Christian principles in his home and in his community. For this reason, it is not necessary to eulogize his at this time. His life was a testimony of Micah's writing: “He has showed you, oh man, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you but to do justice and love kindness and to walk humbly with your God.”

Mr.Keathley served his county as Judge of the County Court from the Southern District and was always a man of high principle and anxious to serve to the best of his ability.

Services were from the White and Sons Chapel Saturday afternoon and burial was at the Arcadia Valley Memorial Park. Rev. Nelson was in charge of the funeral and Whites the funeral arrangements.
(copy of newspaper article in possession of Linda Lewis 2/17/1990)

Children:
DELLA KEATHLEY b .12 May 1893 d. 26 Oct 1966
WILLIAM WALKER KEATHLEY b. 19 Apr 1895 d. 13 Jul 1960
MAY KEATHLEY b. 1897 d. 1897
LUC I LLE KEATHLEY b. 1898 d. 1976
NETTIE KEATHLEY b. 23 May 1900 d. 12 Sep 1955
LESTER KEATHLEY b. 1 Sep 1901 d. 19 Feb 1988
HENRY GIDEON KEATHLEY b. 1903 d. 1903
CHARLES ELMER KEATHLEY b. 30 Jan 1905
CLARENCE RAY KEATHLEY b. 30 Nov 1907
HERSCHEL FRED KEATHLEY b. 1 Mar 1909 d. 9 Aug 1990
ETHA MYRENE KEATHLEY b. 19 Jul 1912
EMMA LORENE KEATHLEY b. 15 Feb 1914
MARSHALL WOODROW KEATHLEY b. 20 Sep 1916


Research notes courtesy of Linda E. Lewis, “George Lewis Descendants”, published October 1992. 
Keathley, William Tyler (I17884176)
 
103 !OBITUARY
J.M. LEWIS EX-IRON COUNTY ASSESSOR DIES

Funeral service was conducted at the Des Arc Missionary Baptist Church Saturday, Nov. 14, at 11 a.m. for one of Iron County's native sons, J. M. Lewis, who departed this life Nov. 12, having attained the age of fourscore and seven years.

The Rev. Gerald Collier and Rev. Elmo Parker were the officiating ministers, with the Rev. and Mrs. Clarence J. Casteel Jr., bringing message in song.

Burial was in the Mountain View Cemetery, Des Arc, under direction of the Gish-Bowles Funeral Home of Piedmont.

Pallbearers were Russell Lewis, Everett Seals, Buford Lewis, Frank Lewis, Francis Lewis, and Louis Seals.

Having spent the years of his useful life in Iron County, Mr. Lewis was a retired farmer and served twelve years as Iron County assessor.

James Monroe Lewis, son of William and Abigail Lewis, was born in Des Arc, Mo., on June 24, 1883 and died at the Clark's Mountain Home in Piedmont, Mo., on Nov. 12, 1970 at the age of 87 years, 4 months and 10 days.

He is survived by his wife, Myrtle M. Lewis of Des Arc, MO., two sons, Orville Lewis of Texas City, Tex., Darwin Lewis of St. Louis, Mo., two daughters, Yvonne Elrod of Piedmont, Mo., and Naomi Zager of Columbia, Mo.

He is survived by 12 grandchildren, 13 great-grandchildren, other relatives and a host of friends.

Mr. Lewis professed his faith in Christ at an early age and at the time of his death was a member of the Des Arc Baptist Church. (MAYNE COUNTY JOURNAL BANNER newspaper ...Piedmont, Wayne County, Missouri... by November 19, 1970)

Research notes courtesy of Linda E. Lewis, “George Lewis Descendants”, published October 1992. 
Lewis, James Monroe (I80155708)
 
104 !OBITUARY
LONG ILLNESS ENDED
Jaies A. Ruble, 73, of Atmapolis, died Nov. 8, 1948, after a long illness. He is survived by his wife, Nellie, four sons, Avery and 0lin of Annapolis,
Glen of St. Louis; and Mollis of Ozark, Alabama; and one daughter, Mrs. Merle King, of Elvins.
Services vere from the Union Church Wednesday afternoon and burial in the Sutton cemetery with White and Sons service.
(THE MOUNTAIN ECHO newspaper...Ironton, Iron County, Missouri...Thursday, November 11, 1948)

iOBlTUARY
James Andrew Ruble, son of William and Hepsia Ruble, was born May 25, 1875, at Vulcan, Mo., and departed this life November 8, 1948, at Annapolis, Mo., at the age of 73 years, 5 months and 14 days.
At an early age he was united in marriage to Minnie Chilton. To this union two children were born. The wife and children preceeded him in death.
He was again united in marriage to Nellie McCormick, January 3, 1903, and to this union were born eight children, three of whom preceeded him in death.
He leaves to mourn his passing his wife, four sons, Avery of Annapolis; Olin, of Vulcan; Glen, of St. Louis; Mollis, of Ozark, Alabama; and one
daughter, Mrs. Hazel King, of Elvins; nine grandchildren, one sister, Mrs. Lizzie Clifford, and one brother. Tom Ruble, both of Vulcan, and a host of
other relatives and friends to mourn his passing.
He professed a hope in Christ several years ago. He was an invalid for several years and bedfast for five years. He was patient and faithful in his
suffering, always looking forward to the time when he would be released from the pain and suffering here. He was a faithful husband and father and a place is vacant in our home which never can be filled, but we know our loss is his gain so we will try to look on the bright side and there will be no more sorrow and pain, so 'We cannot say, and we will not say, that he is dead, he is just away."
(THE MOUNTAIN ECHO newspaper...Ironton, Iron County, MO...November 18, 1948)

Research notes courtesy of Linda E. Lewis, “George Lewis Descendants”, published October 1992. 
Ruble, James Andrew (I75962569)
 
105 !OBITUARY
MRS. ETHEL LEWIS DIED FRIDAY AT CAPE;
WAS BORN AT DES ARC

Mrs. Fred Lewis, long associated with the family business known as Wimpy's Drive in, North Kingshighvay and Cape Rock Drive, died at 1:30 Friday afternoon (Dec. 4, 1970) in a Cape Girardeau nursing home where she had been a patient five years. She had been ill six years.
Mrs. Lewis, 80 years old, was a member of First Presbyterian Church and Cape Navy Mothers League. The family house is at 800 North Kingshighway, Cape Girardeau.
Services were conducted at 2 Sunday afternoon at First Presbyterian Church by the Pastor, Dr. E.C. Brasington, burial in Memorial Park.
The former Miss Ethel M. Miller, Mrs. Lewis was born Jan. 25, 1890, at Des Arc where she married Mr. Lewis in May, 1916.
They moved to Cape Girardeau in 1936 and operated the business with their sons many years, Mrs. Lewis actively engaged in the duties. Mr. Lewis died in 1958.
Survivors include the four sons, Frank M., Francis F., Freeman D. and Billie J. Lewis, and two daughters, Mrs. Truman J. Howard and Mrs. E. Lawrence Bahn Jr., all of Cape Girardeau.
Also surviving are three brothers, W.G. Miller, Amarillo, Tex., Sam
Miller, Jefferson, Iowa, and Posey Miller, Annapolis; three sisters, Mrs. Maude McCormick, Piedmont, Mrs. Elmer Lovelace, Pilot Knob, and Mrs. Charles Dorsey,
Farmington, and twelve grandchildren.
Pallbearers were grandsons of Mrs. Lewis, Taylor and Wm. Bahn, Richard Howard, Robert Lewis, Benny Lewis, Jon Alan Lewis and Duane Lewis.
(WAYNE COUNTY JOURNAL BANNER newspaper ...Piedmont, Wayne County, Missouri... Thursday, December 10, 1970)


Children:
FRANK MILLER LEWIS b.11 Mar 1917
FRANCIS FULTON LEWIS b.31 Oct 1918 d. 1 Jun 1988
FRIEDA ABIGAIL LEWIS b.29 Dec 1920
FREEMAN DALE LEWIS b.20 Jan 1923
MARTHA LETA LEWIS b. 2 Jan 1925
BILLIE JAY LEWIS b. 3 Feb 1929 d. 12 Apr 2005

Research notes courtesy of Linda E. Lewis, “George Lewis Descendants”, published October 1992. 
Miller, Ethel Mayme (I79608444)
 
106 !OBITUARY
OBITUARY OF MARY (POLLY) LEWIS
APRIL 5, 1916

Mary, commonly known as Polly Lewis, was born in Tenn. June 15, 1831. Her maiden name was 6riffith. She was married to Robert Lewis in Tenn. They moved to Arkansas, then to Missouri, settled on Carver Creek 2 1/2 miles frog Sabula, in 1852. She departed this life April 5, 1916, aged 84 years, 9 months, and 20 days. She was the mother of 16 children, of whom 11 are living, 67 grandchildren, 44 great grandchildren.

She was a member of the United Baptist church at Big Creek for almost half century. The remains were laid to rest by the side of her husband in the Emily Chapel burying grounds to await the raising of the just. Elder John Proffit preached the funeral services, with Elder J. R. Singleton concluding.

Being feeble for the past several months yet cheerful, we expected a sudden departure, but not as it was. Working all day at her carpet rags, eating a hearty supper and going to bed as usual. The old home was wrapped in darkness and slumber with its four occupants. In the first hour of the new day about 1 o'clock the summons came. '0, Lord' in a voice as of prayer, came from the bedroom and aroused the vigilant daughter. In a very few moments that spirit who had known it's tenement of clay and went to Godwho gave it.

Now we are satisfied, not because mother is gone, but because we know where she has gone. Rest and rejoice thou weary mother, until we come! We know she can't come to us, but we can go to her. And now may the father of light keep unto the hollow of hand this brother and sisters hand as a peaceful and loving family is the earnest prayer of this

SON (Written by her son Joel)
(above was copied from the original is it appeared in the paper. by Boris Birdsong on Nov. 1, 1964)
(Copy given to Linda Lewis in August 1990 by Billie J. Lewis)

Research notes courtesy of Linda E. Lewis, “George Lewis Descendants”, published October 1992. 
Griffith, Mary "Polly" (I87022956)
 
107 !OBITUARY
Velma Jane Lewis, 71, died in the Missouri Baptist Hospital, St. Louis, on November 4.
She was born in Brunot on Dec. 14, 1917.
She was united in marriage to Elvis Eli Lewis on May 20, 1937, and he preceded her in death on September 7, 1964.
She professed her faith in Christ and at the time of her death was a member of First Baptist Church in Piedmont.
Preceding her in death were two brothers, Chester and Raymond White; two sisters, Ollie Goad and Gertrude White.
Survivors include seven sons, Paul Vernon Lewis of Troy, Hollis Lewis of Piedmont, Walter Lewis of House Springs, Wayne Lewis of St. Louis, Jerry Lewis of O'Fallon, David Lewis of Marietta, Georgia, Gary Lewis of Arnold; three daughters, Maxine Pyles of St. Charles, Cynthia Young of Stouton, Illinois, Carolyn Raddatz of Piedmont; three brothers, Arlie White of Des Arc) Elmer White of Ironton, Charley White of Placerville, California; one sister, Ruby McKinney of Woodstock, Virginia; thirty-two grandchildren; sixteen great-grandchildren, other relatives and many friends.
Services were held at First Baptist Church in Piedmont with Reverend Thomas Bray and Reverand Lee Roy Quinn officiating.
Music was by Julie and Curt Knodell, and Aggie Parker was pianist, organ music was by Gary Sullivan and Nancy Pyles.
Pallbearers were Mike, Danny, Jeff, Jason, Scott, Randy, Damon and John Lewis.
Honorary Pallbearers were Nicholas and Brian Lewis.
Burial was in the Mountain View Cemetery.
Arrangements were by Ruegg Funeral Homes, Inc. of Piedmont.
(Original newspaper clipping in possession of Edna Ruble Sutton in March 1991) 
White, Velma Jane (I57172028)
 
108 !OBITUARY
Velma Jane Lewis, 71, died in the Missouri Baptist Hospital, St. Louis, on November 4.
She was born in Brunot on Dec. 14, 1917.
She was united in marriage to Elvis Eli Lewis on May 20, 1937, and he preceded her in death on September 7, 1964.
She professed her faith in Christ and at the time of her death was a member of First Baptist Church in Piedmont.
Preceding her in death were two brothers, Chester and Raymond White; two sisters, Ollie Goad and Gertrude White.
Survivors include seven sons, Paul Vernon Lewis of Troy, Hollis Lewis of Piedmont, Walter Lewis of House Springs, Wayne Lewis of St. Louis, Jerry Lewis of O'Fallon, David Lewis of Marietta, Georgia, Gary Lewis of Arnold; three daughters, Maxine Pyles of St. Charles, Cynthia Young of Stouton, Illinois, Carolyn Raddatz of Piedmont; three brothers, Arlie White of Des Arc) Elmer White of Ironton, Charley White of Placerville, California; one sister, Ruby McKinney of Woodstock, Virginia; thirty-two grandchildren; sixteen great-grandchildren, other relatives and many friends.
Services were held at First Baptist Church in Piedmont with Reverend Thomas Bray and Reverand Lee Roy Quinn officiating.
Music was by Julie and Curt Knodell, and Aggie Parker was pianist, organ music was by Gary Sullivan and Nancy Pyles.
Pallbearers were Mike, Danny, Jeff, Jason, Scott, Randy, Damon and John Lewis.
Honorary Pallbearers were Nicholas and Brian Lewis.
Burial was in the Mountain View Cemetery.
Arrangements were by Ruegg Funeral Homes, Inc. of Piedmont.
(Original newspaper clipping in possession of Edna Ruble Sutton in March 1991) 
White, Velma Jane (I57172028)
 
109 !OBITUARY
W.W. LEWIS

William Walter 'Billy' Lewis died at Bonne Terre Hospital, Feb. 6, being 87 years of age. He was born December 1, 1876, in Iron County, the son of the late William Lewis and Adie Gail (Johnson) Lewis. His wife, Mary Estell Lewis, preceded him in death.

He is survived by the following children, Emma, (Mrs. Clyde Davis) of Flat River; Audrey (Mrs. Finis Dalton) of Flat River; Golden Lewis of St. Louis; Ada Mae (Mrs. Lodus Hill) of St. Louis; Mary Leona (Mrs. Wayne Skaggs) of Compton, California; 11 grandchildren, 22 great grandchildren; one great great grandchild; a brother, Jim Lewis of Des Arc; and a number of nieces and nephews.

The body was in state at the Raymond Caldwell and Sons Funeral Chapel in Flat River until one o'clock Sunday. Funeral service was conducted at two o'clock at the Taylor Avenue Methodist Church in Flat River by the Rev. Harold Nance.

Burial was in St. Francois Memorial Park with arrangements under the direction of the Raymond Caldwell and Sons Funeral Home.
(WAYNE COUNTY JOURNAL BANNER newspaper ...Piedmont, Wayne County, Missouri... Thursday, February 13, 1964)

Children:
EMMA LEWIS
AUDREY LEWIS
GOLDEN LEWIS
ADA MAE LEWIS
MARY LEONA LEWIS

Research notes courtesy of Linda E. Lewis, “George Lewis Descendants”, published October 1992. 
Lewis, William Walter (I13730230)
 
110 !WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENT

WEDDING BELLS

Our assessor J.M. Lewis and Miss Myrtle Fowler, were united in marriage at
the home of the former, by Rev. Dr. G.A. Pegram, Friday, Oct. 9, 1925, at seven
o'clock. About an hour later a crowd of fifty-eight persons gathered for the
customary charavari, and congratulations. The writer joins their zany friends
in entreating Providence to smile on this happy two through the coming years.
E.S.
(IRON COUNTY REGISTER newspaper ...Ironton, Iron Co., NO ...Thurs., Oct. 15, 1925)
 
Lewis, James Monroe (I80155708)
 
111 'History of Bond and Montgomery Counties, Illinois'
Newton A. HUGHEY, farmer, P. O. Greenville; is a native of Missouri. He was born
October 8, 1838, in Perry County. His father was Milus Hughey, born March 5,
1811, in Rowan County, N. C., and was married November 2, 1837, to Staty Regina
Parks, born November, 1818, daughter of Joseph Parks, of North Carolina. Milus
removed with his father Henry Hughey, to Perry County, Mo., about the year 1825,
when a lad. Here the family settled. Henry Hughey was born May 25, 1785. He
married Elizabeth Gillen, born January 20, 1788. The fruits of this union were
John, Stanhope, Newton A., Jane, Mary and Milus, all of whom attained to man and
womanhood, and settled in Missouri. Henry Hughey died December 25, 1831; his
wife, January 26, 1845. Milus Hughey was a farmer, and for many years was a
member of the Presbyterian Church, and a Ruling Elder of the same. He died
January 29, 1867; his wife 1844. But two children were born them - Newton A. and
Susan E. The latter married Henry Bimpage; she is now deceased. In April, 1861,
Newton A. Hughey married Julia A. Stevenson, born November 2, 1840, in Cape
Girardeau Co., Mo., daughter of A. K. Stevenson, of North Carolina. He was a son
of James Stevenson and Jane Fleming. They raised a family of three children. Mr.
A. K. Stevenson died November 9, 1881; his wife in 1844. Mr. Hughey came to Bond
County in 1864, locating where he now resides. He has 210 acres, and has put
nearly all the improvements on the same. Has four children - Emery G., Linley
J., Pearl E. and Roxana. Two died when infants. Mr. Hughey is a member and elder
of the Presbyterian Church. Mrs. Hughey's brother Linley was a soldier in the
late war; member of Company B, Twenty-ninth Missouri Infantry. He died October
1862, in the hospital at St. Louis. 
Hughey, Newton Augustus (I26313856)
 
112 "Emery Grant Hughey, son of Newton Augustus and Julia (Stevenson) Hughey was
born April 3, 1862 in Perry county, Missouri and died near Ayers May 15, 1938.
He was married August 15, 1886 to Anna Belle Stout.
He is survived by sons, Elmer D. of Greenville, George K. of Springfield,
Missouri, Howard E. of south of Greenville and Horace A. Hughey of Elmhurst,
Illinois and daughter, Mrs. Lena A. Hubbell of north of Greenville, sister, Miss
Edith Hughey of near Ayers and brothers, Pearl E. hughey of Cleo Springs,
Oklahoma, J.L. Hughey of Enid, Oklahoma and five grandchildren."
Taken from page 25 of 'Union Grove Cemetery Bond County, Illinois,' published by
the Bond County Genealogical Society. 
Hughey, Emery Grant (I92535203)
 
113 "Florida Death Index, 1877-1998," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VV35-8M1 : 25 December 2014), Isaac Rajala, Jan 1966; from "Florida Death Index, 1877-1998," index, Ancestry (www.ancestry.com : 2004); citing vol. 2784, certificate number 4244, Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Records, Jacksonville. Rajala, Isaac (I97291688)
 
114 "I will explain how I came to this conclusion if anyone wants to know, but I am now confident that I have identified the family of my great grandmother, Adeline Lewis (Green). And of course, this comes right after I had resigned myself to another ten years of searching. I have suspected for several weeks that the Jacob Lewis family of Madison County Missouri was my line, and that his daughter Bidda was my great grandmother. However, I had given up on finding any hard facts that would allow me to make thisclaim with confidence. People did occasionally change their first names, but it is not all that common. I needed something substantial before accepting a name change. Then I discovered that Jacob's youngest daughter Emeline (Lewis) Voyles and her husbandhad joined Allen and Adeline Green in the very small town of Buda, Illinois for several years in the late 1870s and early 1880s. With all the other evidence pointing to this connection, I am now convinced. Bidda and Adeline are the same person, and she is my great grandmother.

In a way I feel a little sad because I had researched several Lewis lines so diligently I got to feel like I knew them personally. There is a sense of loss to realize they are not my family. But then, all of them did come out of North Carolina, so a common bond may yet exist.

A quick look at the records gives me an overview of this family. There were at least two Lewis brothers, John and Benjamin, living in Buncombe County, North Carolina after the Revolutionary War. Together they moved to Cocke County, Tennessee, which was nogreat distance. I cannot tell yet just when they made the move because the census records of Tennessee are missing until 1830. In the early 1820s the state of Tennessee began selling land in that area very cheaply (12 1/2 cents per acre) to raise money for their school system. It is possible that the Lewis families came at that time, but I can't say yet. This is all too new for me at this time.

Apparently John and Benjamin Lewis had a sister Bidda, and she married a Randolph Lane (Lain). This family was among the Cocke County settlers. Two of the next generation, George and Jacob Lewis, were born in N C, but reached adulthood in Cocke County where they married. Jacob married Mary Martin, and these would be my great great grandparents. Since Mary would not have been alone as a young single girl on the wilderness frontier, her family was no doubt in Cocke County also. Adeline (Bidda) Green, my great grandmother, stated in the 1880 census that her mother was born in South Carolina. Often times the place someone spent their childhood is confused in the census records with the actual place of birth. Mary (Martin) Lewis lists Tennessee as her place ofbirth, but I noticed that the elder head of the Martin family in 1830 Cocke County is Samuel Martin. He is a veteran of the Revolution War having served from South Carolina. This is all coming together.

I will encourage any of you who wish to work together to sort out this family to contact me and begin exchanging information. One of the immediate problems is to identify which of the SE Missouri Lewis families is descended from John, and which from Benjamin. About all we know for now as far as I know is that Helen has placed Sampson Lewis of Butler County Missouri with Benjamin. There is a Zacariah Lewis also in Butler who is older than Sampson and apparently connected, but not necessarily a brother.

Also, the possibility exists that John, Benjamin, and Bidda had other siblings. In fact, it is even likely. I am very eager to examine the pension file for Samuel Martin to find out where he lived in SC, and if there were any Lewis families in the same area. Is this exciting or what????" [Bill Green, BGreen7619@aol.com]

1850 (August 28) 54th District Madison Co., MO Federal Census, page 230A; lines 7-14
Dwelling # 492/Family # 492
LANE, Randolph 47 yr farmer VA
LANE, Nancy 16 TN
LANE, Isaac 15 TN
LANE, Jacob 12 TN
LANE, Rhedy (Rhody?) 10 MO
LANE, Catharine 8 MO
LANE, Tabitha 8 MO
LANE, Moses 6 MO
(Note: Wife Biddy does not appear in this census; daughters Catharine & Tabitha listed as same age - could they be twins?? Where is son Elias in this census?? Elias marries Mary Polly HUFF after the August census was taken because she is listed as living in her father Joseph's household for the census.)

1860, July 14 - PO Polk Spring, Liberty Twp, Iron Co., MO, page 743
Dwelling # 906 / Family # 885
LANE, Randolph 56 y/o, farmer, VA
LANE, Biddy 56 SC
LANE, Catharine 16 MO
LANE, Moses 15 MO farmer
SMITH, Ellen 7 MO
(Note: Living next door is his son Jacob #886, 2 house down is Joseph WILSON #888 & next to him is Robert LANE & wife Elizabeth (WILSON) LANE #889 -- Robert would've only been about 14 y/o in the 1850 census therefore he is probably a nephew of Randolph's) - #890 is Randolph's son Elias Lane. His other son Isaac can be found in the 1860 census of Reynolds Co., PO Rainsville, Logan Twp, MO.)

1870 federal census
I have not been able to find Randolph & Biddy in this census in Randolph Co. or Lawrence Co, AR nor can I find daughter Catharine who is now married to F. M. KIZER -- I thought they may have been living with her since it seemed she appeared to remain close to her parents & is even buried with them in the Reynolds Cemetery in Randolph Co., AR. They are not listed in the home of son Isaac Lane who is living in or near Ironton, Iron Co., MO. Randolph & Biddy both died in 1879 so they should've been counted in this census, however it is possible that they were missed (not at home) the day the census taker knocked on the door. John & Martha (Spier) Lane, sons Elias & Mary P. (HUFF) LANE & Moses & Eliza (WILLIAMS) LANE can be found in Roanoke Township; Jacob &Harriet (?Pangston?) Lane is living near Pocohontas, Little Black Twp. Daughter Tabitha is now married to Benjamin VANCE & is possibly living in St. Francois Co., MO but haven't been able to find them. Nor have I found further information on daughter Rhedy or Rhody.

22 Sep 1865 - Randolph Co., AR DEED RECORDS, page 648.
RANDOLPH buys 107 & 13/100 acres located NW of Dalton, Randolph Co., AR for $450 (SW part of SW fractional fourth of Section No. 22 & NW fourth of North Section No. 27 in Twp 21 North of baseline R2W). This land was purchased from Mazzella, Leonidas, Martha J. & William Brown.

1865 - Randolph County, Arkansas, TAX RECORDS.
RANDOLPH was taxed based on 108 acres of land valued at $450. And 2 horses valued at $225. He was charged a State Tax of $2.25 & County tax of $1.00.

1866 - Randolph Co., AR TAX RECORDS.
The following were taxed in Davidson Township: RANDOLPH LANE, JACOB LANE, MOSES LANE

1867 - Randolph Co., AR TAX RECORDS
The following were taxed in the Spring River Township: RANDOLPH LANE, ELIAS LANE, MOSES LANE.

REYNOLDS CEMETERY
Located closer to Elm Store than to Dalton; just south of Elm Store on west side of Hwy 93.

BAKER, Tolitha C. .... b: Mar 7 1871 d: Oct 29 1879 [d/o John & Sarah M. (LANE) BAKER]
KIZER, Catherine .... b: Sep 25 1842 d: May 21 1896 [w/o Francis Marion; d/o Randolph & Biddy]
KIZER, Julian Randle .... b: Aug 3 1870 d: Feb 15 1900 [h/o Mahlia Margaret Elizabeth BROWN; s/o Francis M. & Catherine (LANE) KIZER]
KIZER, John R. .... b: 1871 d: Nov 19 1936 [h/o Berdi BROOKS then Rosena Bonner ARNOLD; s/o Francis M. & Catherine (Lane) KIZER]
BROWN, Rebecca .... b: Nov 25 1875 d: Feb 7 1968 w/o John Brown; d/o Catharine LANE & Francis KIZER)
BROWN, F. Ed [Francis Edward] ... b: 15 Jan 1906 d: 17 Feb 1981 (s/o Rebecca KIZER & John BROWN)
BROWN, Mayme Edith ... b: Nov 3 1902 d: May 12 1992 (d/o Rebecca & John)
BROWN, Taylor ... b: 22 Jan 1909 d: 4 Oct 1915 (s/o Rebecca KIZER & John BROWN)
LANE, Biddy .... b: Jul 9 1803 d: Mar 24 1879 [w/o Randolph LANE]
LANE, Elias .... b:July 20 1831 d: Arp 4 1890 [husband of Mary P. HUFF]
LANE Luther I. .... b: Jan 6 1896 d: Nov 28 1896 [son of I.M. & M.A. -- Irvin Moses & Melissa Ann (GAINES) LANE]
LANE, Randolph .... b: Apr 9 1803 d: Jul 25 1879 [h/o Biddy]
STUBBLEFIELD, Sarah M. .... b: Oct 22, 1852 d: Aug 2 1932 [w/o John BAKER, then Joseph STUBBLEFIELD; d/o Elias & Mary P. (HUFF) LANE]
Submitted by Sherry Link.



[Randolph Lane.FTW]

Biddy's maiden name has remained elusive to those of us researching the family. Vern Eldridge writes that Palmer and Margeret Lane state that they recall Everett saying that his father (Moses) had told him that his mother's maiden name was "Dunn". Others feel that her maiden name might have been "Lewis" or 'Gilliand".

In the 1850 Madison Co., MO census Biddy is not listed in the household of Randolph but she is there in 1860 Liberty Twp., Iron Co, MO - listing her birthplace as from South Carolina.

July 12, 2000, Gary D. Lane writes:
I am again questioning Biddy's maiden name.
We know she is listed as being from SC, and her children indicate their mother as being from SC. However the only families we find near Randolph who are from SC are the Dunns. With brother (?) John, in 1850, is his father-in-law Robert Gilliland, who is listed as being from SC. And next to Robert is his son William, b 1805, listed as being from TN. I'm going back to my original belief that Biddy is a Dunn, and I suspect she is the daughter of Mary Dunn. I realize Mary would have been about fourteen when Biddy was born. What's your thoughts on this? 
Lewis, Biddy (I48344704)
 
115 "Miss Edith Hughey, 87, a resident of Greenville since 1938, died at the
Hillsboro hospital, March 25, 1958. She was born September 1, 1870 in LaGrange
township, daughter of Newton Augustus and Julia A. (Stevenson) Hughey. She is
the last of her family, three brothers, Emery G., James Lindley, Pearl E. and
twin sisters who died in infancy, having preceded her in death."

Taken from page 35 of 'Union Grove Cemetery Bond County, Illinois,' published by
the Bond County Genealogical Society. 
Hughey, Edith R. (I64479872)
 
116 "Pedigree Resource File," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/2:2:3MJS-W5S : accessed 1 September 2019), entry for Marie /Stecher/; file (2:2:2:MM4J-FMK), submitted 1 April 2012. Stecher, Marie (I59737811)
 
117 "Pedigree Resource File," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/2:2:9HCX-L1H : accessed 24 August 2019), entry for Hermann Hinrich Engelbrecht; file (2:2:2:MM95-KWJ), submitted 8 October 2000. Engelbrecht, Hermann Hinrich (I52079404)
 
118 "Pedigree Resource File," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/2:2:9HCX-L1H : accessed 24 August 2019), entry for Hermann Hinrich Engelbrecht; file (2:2:2:MM95-KWJ), submitted 8 October 2000. Engelbrecht, Hermann Hinrich (I52079404)
 
119 "Pedigree Resource File," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/2:2:9HCX-LBG : accessed 24 August 2019), entry for Anna Maria Engelbrecht; file (2:2:2:MM95-KWJ), submitted 8 October 2000. Engelbrecht, Anna Marie (I1914024)
 
120 "Pedigree Resource File," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/2:2:9HCX-LPJ : accessed 24 August 2019), entry for Anna Grete Ilsabein Griese; file (2:2:2:MM95-KWJ), submitted 8 October 2000. Family F94879932
 
121 "Pedigree Resource File," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/2:2:9HCX-LYX : accessed 25 August 2019), entry for Heinrich Christian Engelbrecht; file (2:2:2:MM95-KWJ), submitted 8 October 2000. Family F5822698
 
122 "Per her obituary, she is probably buried elsewhere:
Press Journal (St. Louis, Missouri) 30 Nov 2005. Obituary for Heberer [Syberg], Dorothy L. b 21 Feb 1908.
Dorothy L. ( Heberer ) Syberg of St. Louis, Mo., died Nov. 17, 2005, in Creve Coeur, Mo. She was 97.
Mrs. Syberg was a homemaker. She was born Feb. 21, 1908, in St. Louis, Mo. Mrs. Syberg was preceded in death by her husband, Edwin George Syberg. She is survived by her son, Kenneth (Cheryl) Syberg; daughter, Judi Charlton; five grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; and other relatives. She was preceded in death by her brother, Harvey Heberer . The funeral was Nov. 21 at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church in south St. Louis, with interment at St. Paul Churchyard in Affton. Arrangements were made by Schrader Funeral Home. Memorials may be made to the American Heart Association, 4643 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 63108.
Press Journal (St. Louis, MO)
Date: November 30, 2005
Record Number: 0009549365
Copyright 2005, Press Journal, All Rights Reserved."
Information furnished by Chris Heberer, 11-9-2011
 
Heberer, Dorothy (I83522819)
 
123 (References: Listed as "Baby Huters" in Death Records of City of Cape Girardeau, MO, Book A transcribed by Cape Girardeau Genealogical Society (1987); Memorial on the life of William Henry Huters for the Session of the First Presbyterian Church by M. B. Oliver, noting that three of the ten children of William Henry Huters and Marie Mahnke Huters died in infancy,)

Compiled by:
Daniel S. Johnson
Durham, N.C.
November, 2009 
Huters, Baby Boy (I10938445)
 
124 (Research): Regenhardt, Edward Franz Hermann (I3460434)
 
125 (Research):FROM NORTH CAROLINA TO MISSOURI 1819

The Revolutionary War was over, Thomas Jefferson had purchased the Louisiana Territory from France. First there were exploring parties, then the establishment of forts, missions, and settlements. Lewis and Clark ascended the Missouri River in the summerof 1804. Zebulos M. Pike explored parts of Kansas and Nebraska two years later. A scientific expedition under Major Stephen H. Long came up the Missouri, in the first steamboat to enter the country, in 1819.
The War of 1812 took the English and Indians out of the territory which is now Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. The Indians that were left were being pushed West onto reservations. Settlement of the Louisiana Territory was the issue of the day. Spain and France had tried to settle it for the past 100 years but were unsuccessful.
There was a trail west from the Carolina and Virginias through the Cumberland Gap, on through Tennessee and Kentucky that Daniel Boone, Simon Kenton and others had established before the Revolutionary War. It went on to cross the Ohio River close to where it joined the Mississippi, To cross the Mississippi the trail led to Moccasin Springs, where Mr. Green ran the ferry that took you across the river. The Trail of Tears State Park is there now.

Mitchell Fleming, James Stevenson, Zenos Ross, Robert McFarland, Anderson Mitchell. Mr. Querry, Thomas Wilson, J. Wallace, John Garner, ____ Hill, and Phillip Clodfelter all came to the Louisiana Territory over that trail. Whether they were all in the same wagon train or in different groups, I don't know. There were lots of wagon trains going west at that time. As history goes, some traveled on Sunday and some didn't. Any way, they all settled within walking distance (at that time) of each other. I do know that Phillip Clodfelter came alone.

SETTLED IN CAPE GIRARDEAU COUNTY, MISSOURI

The territory was was settling up fast. The county seat was moved from Cape Girardeau to Jackson in 1815. The north end of Cape County is where the Stevensons lived. I'll try to locate the eleven families that made up the community where my ancestors lived.
They all entered land along the Blue Shawnee or Muddy Shawnee Creeks, except Anderson Mitchell. He was east of the Mitchell Fleming place, at the top of a little hollow that runs into Lovejoy Hollow. It is just my guess that if you went back a generation or two you would find Andersons in the Mitchell family and Mitchells in the Fleming family.
We will leave the Anderson Mitchell place, go due west over the ridge to Zenos Ross' place. His land joined Mitchell Fleming's land. Zenos' land was ridge land, his house was up in the timber, while Mitchell Fleming's 80 acres was bottom land along BlueShawnee Creek. The Fleming graveyard is in the northeast corner of this plot. Ross married a Fleming girl.
Across Blue Shawnee a little south of the Fleming place, there
is where James and Jane Stevenson raised their family. Out of their ten children only two of them that lived stayed in Missouri, Alexander K. and William. Alexander bought Robert McFarland's place when he moved to Illinois. William stayed on the home place.
Go on west across Muddy Shawnee Creek, on the west bank was the Hill place. This is where he got the idea of the hog ring for which he later received a patent. You can still buy Hill Hog Rings.
His daughter Margaret was Alexander K. Stevenson's first wife. They had three children. Julia went to Illinois, Mary Jane died in infancy. Linley was the boy, he grew up with Ransom Mitchell. They were buddies; whatever one did the other did. I've heard my Granddad say, "if they were playing a game at school they had to both be on the same side or they wouldn't play. When the Civil War broke out Linley joined the Union Army, Ransom stayed homne and remained neutral. Linley went through the war in Cape Girardeau, Shiloh, and the seige at Vicksburg. When he was being mustered out in St. Louis he took small pox and died. He was buried in Old Apple Creek Cemetery, Pocahontas, MO.
Frankie Jane (Shoults) Carruthers has some letters that Linly wrote, from Vicksburg, to her Grandpa Ransom while the seige was going on. In one letter he said, "There hasn't been a shot fired today. I think they are as big a cowards as we are." He asked Ransom if he was taking care of the girls, and he thought that he would take caligraphy when he got back home. The letters are written with black ink, his hand writing was good.
About three quarters of a mile down the creek was the Quary place. The house wasn't close to the creek, it was up on the ridge but there was a good spring there. When Knox bought the place he built a big house north of the spring on the top of the hill.
My dad told me this story. Issac Query was one of the boys. He was an old bachelor when Dad was a little boy in the 1890's. He lived with my Grandpa and was sort of a hired hand. He liked to hunt.
Issac was training the dog to not be gun shy. One day Issac told Dad to come and go with him and the dog squirrel hunting. Dad didn't want to go, but he went anyway. Dad said that Issac really knew what it took to break a dog of gunshyness. Dad said he never knew when his gun shyness was broken. As long as I knew him he could shoot with the experts. He taught "we boys" how to use a gun.
In August of 1970, I pulled my trailer to Fruitland from Albequergue and parked it in my Dad's backyard. The next morning just at daylight a charge went off right over our trailer. Wanda jumped out of bed, I was beginning to think I was back in the old Army and that was the reville cannon. I got out to see what was going on. Dad was standing in the yard with the shotgun in one hand and a starling in the other. He said he was just getting his exercise. He threw the bird down on a pile of birds in a flower bed next to a tree. Ther were 32 birds and 33 empty shells. He said, "I must have missed one." I always figured that he got his basic training from Issac Query.
The next place north of the Quary place was that of Thomas Wilson. He had a section or more of land (all ridge land) away from the creek.
Appleton was about five miles north of this settlement. That was where everyone went to get their mail. When anyone was there
they picked up the mail for all that were close around them. Thomas Wilson was there when the news came that Lincoln was elected President. When he came back and passed out the mail he said, "Lincoln was elected and I'm ready to fight". He was one thathad slaves.
The Wallace place was bottom land along the creek between the Quary place and the 80 acres that Mitchell Fleming gave to Robert McFarland when he married his daughter Agness.
The McFarland place was mostly bottom land. He didn't want the house in the bottom so he bought ten acres from Thomas Wilson and built a big two story log house away from the creek. There
wasn't a spring close so they dug a well. The old house and log barn stood there for well over a hundred years. All that is there now to mark the place is the well.
My Great-grandfather bought the place from McFarland when he moved to Illinois. This is where Alexander K. Stevenson raised his family.
by Meredith Stevenson 
Stevenson, Alexander Kennedy (I84038738)
 
126 (Research):THE STEVENSON FAMILY

Certificate of Service in the Revolution

NORTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL COMMISSION
This is to certify that this is an accurate copy from records in the official custody of the North Carolina Historical Commission. The United States of America to the State of North Carolina. For sundries furnished the Military of North Carolina, as allowed by Cathey and Harris, auditors, Salisbury District
as per their report No. 37.

To Capt. Jas. Stevenson, for services of himself and
Company P payroll 6401 Pounds: 482.14.2

(Report No. 37 is undated. Report 32 is dated June 1781. Report No. 40 is dated Sept. 1781.)

From: Accounts of United States with North Carolina, War of Revolution, Book A, page 184.
Raleigh, July 30, 1924.

(Signed) R. B. House, Archivist


The above is a copy of the official records furnished me by Mr. House.
My mother frequently told brother John And myself about her grandfather whom she remembers distinctly; having lived in the house with him,and having been about 10 years old when he died. She told us that he had served in the Revolutionary War, and was an elder in Poplar Tent Church.
She also told us of a Gen. Stevenson, who was a distant relative, but not a ---(I've forgotten what). But since I've found out that there were two James Stevensons, soldiers from the same county, I feel sure that she told us why her grandfather signed his name as he did.
According to Kennedy Stevenson, there were three Stevenson brothers who lived in Pennsylvania. Two remained there, while the other one came to North Carolina and became our ancestors. It Seems that this one was Kennedy's grandfather, the one here called Capt. Jas. Stevenson. If so he must have come to North Carolina about the beginning of the Revolution. Pay Roll 6401 was manifestly for service in the Gates and Green Campaigns in 1780 & 1781.
I have gotten the marriage bonds of my grandfather John Stevenson to Elizabeth Cockran, and of his younger sister Deborah to William Hauck. But I have not succeeded in finding the marriage bond of my Great-grandfather Stevenson or Latta.
My mother remembers lighting her grandmother's pipe, so she must have died in the later 20's. Her grandfather seems to have died in the early part of 1832. The plantation was willed to my grandfather, John Stevenson, who sold it out to different partiesand started to Missouri on October 1, 1832, taking his three single sisters with him.
There were many families of Stevensons in North Carolina before the Revolution and doubtless Great-grandfather was related to some of them. I mention one of them: William Stevenson came to Pennsylvania in 1748 and to North Carolina in 1784. He was quite a noted character, and very prominent in church work. From his powerful prayers, he was familiarly known as "Little Gabriel". Our ancestors were probably a relative of his.
Stevenson, Steven's son, is a very common name and has always been familiar in Presbyterian circles. In 1860, there were 27 ministers of that name in Presbyterian churches throughout the world. In 1926, there were 22 in the U.S.A. Presbyterian Church, some of them descendants of "Little Gabriel".
In the census of 1790, there were two James Stevenson's in Mecklenburg County as follows:
1. James Stevenson, males over 16, 1; males under 16, 4; females, 4.
2. Jas. Stevenson, males over 16, 1; males under 16, 2; Females, 5.

Our family records show only two sons; James born 1781, & John born 1786, and they give us the names of only three daughters born before 1790, on of whom, Sarah, was born Feb. 8. 1790. There were no twins, and their birth records would be as follows:
a. James, b. 6/30/1781
b. Margaret, b. 1783
c. John, b. 1/11/1786
d. Jane, b. 1788
e. Sarah, b. 2/3/1790
f. Debora, b. 1793.

If there were four daughters in 1790, one of them must have been born before 1781. Another reason for thinking this was the case is that Mother speaks in her Journal of receiving a letter from "cousin John Nesbit". But I have not been able to find a marriage bond.
Capt. James Stevenson owned a farm in the neighborhood of Poplar Tent, large enough to be called a plantation. He was an elder in that church for many years before his death in 1832. His son James Stevenson and Jane Fleming were married in Cabarrus County where Poplar Tent is located. But John Stevenson and Mrs. Elizabeth Cochrane were married in Rowan County. Probably James Stevenson may have lived in Rowan before moving to Missouri in 1819; as Elizabeth, born in 1819 is said to have been born in Rowan County.

My knowledge of the home life of Poplar Tent family is derived from my mother, who often talked to us children about it. She was ten years old when her grandfather died, and she remembered him distinctly. She also remembered her grandmother. The two families lived together, probably in adjoining houses; the grandfather and the grandmother with the three maiden aunts in one house, and the father and mother with the six children in the other.

Aunt Deborah and William Hauch were married before Mother was a year old. It was a delightful home as remembered by Mother.
But James and family had moved to Missouri a dozen years before and many neighbors were going. Mother's half-sister and brother had gone. The Missouri craze was on, but the grandfather was too old to think of going. So he willed his farm to his son John, probably with the understanding that after his death, John would sell out and take his single sisters to Missouri.

About this time Congress granted a pension to the State Militia soldiers who had served in the Revolution. But his discharge was lost so he filed to get a pension His hand shook so he could not write his name, and his hand had to be held to make his mark. It seems he died in the first part of 1832. The recorder of the county wrote me that my grandfather, John Stevenson, had sold the land in different tracts.
Wagons and teams were provided, and on October 1, 1832, they started for Missouri. It was beautiful weather, and they had a delightful trip. On the first Sunday out they did not leave camp. Some acquaintances passed who were also going to Missouri, and they quyed them about lying up on Sunday. The answer was, when you get there, tell them we're coming, but they were passed at the crossing of the Ohio River, and the Sunday travelers got in several days late with poor and fagged teams.

They must have visited with their brother James in Cape Girardeau County and with their children David and Eleanor Luckey, and Robert N. Cochran in Perry County before buying a home. But at last they found a 80 acre tract of vacant land joining David Luckey's place on the S.E. which he entered and built a temporary house. A good log house was built later, either by grandfather, or Uncle Bell.

A bunch of Presbyterians had settled on Long Branch; a school house was built on the land of Mr. Campbell, an elder of the church, about a half mile west of Grandfather's home. A church had been built some distance west but had burned down by this time. But they preached in an arbor on old Mr. Cline's place. Rev. John F. Cowan had charge of Brazeau and Apple Creek Churches. So the family joined the church in May, 1834.

One of the sisters, Margaret I think, married Mitch Fleming Jr. and moved to his place near Apple Creek Church. In May, grandfather and grandmother visited them, and while there, grandfather and grandmother and Aunt Margaret took violently ill, and all three died within a week. It was supposed that they were poisoned by the water that seeped into the Spring from a nearby graveyard. It is my understanding that Jane (the single sister) married Mitchell Fleming after the death of Margaret.

Shortly after the death of her parents, the oldest daughter Mary married --- Bell, and they obtained the 80 acres. Uncle David Luckey opened his house and home to the orphaned family. In a few years Elizabeth married James Hope, an elder of the Apple Creek Church. Adaline married Joseph McLane. James went to friends near Reno, IL. He made his home with a man named Douglas, I think. One of Mr. Douglas' sons became a prominent S. S. worker and minister. James died while still a young man. John died in Louisiana in 1854. I think he was engaged in buying horses in Illinois and Missouri and driving them to Louisiana. He died among strangers.

Mother made her home for some time with her sister Lizzie Hope, and went to the Shawnee School, a kind of High School conducted by a Mr. Morris. She thus fitted herself for teaching, and taught for some time before she married Father in March 1846.

From the earliest times the Stevensons have been Scotch-Irish Presbyterians. But in later times some of them have become Methodists. Amos K., a son of Kennedy is a local Methodist minister, and his son Carl is in the itinerancy. I think Amos' twin brother, Theodore, and his family are Methodists. Two of the sons of Mitchell Fleming Stevenson have been elders in the Presbyterian Church. His daughter, Mrs. Alice Gibbens is in the Congregational Church. So far as I know all of the descendants of Captain Jas. Stevenson are upright, law abiding citizens with the confidence and esteem of their neighbors.

Of those who remained in North Carolina, the Hauchs and the Nesbits, I know nothing. There may be none remaining in the old home, or there may be scores of them. But a glance at their genealogy shows them scattered all over Missouri, Illinois, Kansas, Texas, Dakota, and California. Everywhere they form a nucleus of a high type of Christian civilization.

-from "the History of the Stevenson Family" by Rev. S. A. McPherson.
Written in 1927.


NORTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL COMMISSION
This is to certify that this is an accurate copy from records in the
official custoday of the Noth Carolina Historical Commission. The United States
of America to the State of North Carolina. For sundries furnished the Military
of North Carolina, as allowed by Cathey and Harris, auditors, Salisbury District
as per their report No. 37.

To Capt. Jas. Stevenson, for services
of himself and Company P payroll 6401 Pounds: 482.14.2

(Report No. 37 is undated. Report 32 is dated June 1781. Report No. 40 is
dated Sept. 1781.)

From: Accounts of United States with North Carolina, War of Revolution,
Book A, page 184. Raleigh, July 30, 1924.

(Signed) R. B. House, Archivist 
Stevenson, Captain James (I78580644)
 
127 [from her brother Clarence Keathley in March 1988]
Lester was one of a kind!

She lived a full life with wide experience and a consuming interest in all phases of life. Being a member of a large family she was the "pivotal" point and a magnet to all.

She was very considerate of all her relatives. She kept in close contact with relatives and friends and maintained an historical record by the use of photographs. Brothers and sisters benefited through her financial and moral support. She also made it possible, through the acquisition of the Russellville home, for our parents to enjoy many happy years of retirement. The home became family headquarters for all--children, grandchildren, relatives and friends.

A dedicated, trained elementary school teacher for over forty years, she was justly proud of her profession.

We, the remaining members of the family could be proud if we could measure up to her zest for living.

***

Lester Keathley was born September 1, 1901, the sixth of thirteen children of William Tyler and Martha Evaline Lewis Keathley. She was named for her mother's friend, a woman named Lester.

After graduating from high school, Lester attended Stephens and College and University of Missouri to earn her teaching credentials. She taught at Bristol School in Webster Groves, Missouri during the week, and travelled home by train to take care of her parents and sister on the weekends.

Lester wrote a story about seeing Halley's Comet as the family rode their wagon to church on a Sunday morning in 1910. Since communication was limited, no one was aware the comet was coming, and it was a scary event for many people. But Lester remembers being unhappy that day because she had to wear her sister's black poplin coat!

Lester is remembered as an open-minded, compassionate person. Her niece Jean Gover credited Lester with helping her through the time of her parents' divorce. Lester always looked after Jean, no matter where she lived.

After their parents died, Lester and her sister Lorene moved to a house on Reynolds in Ironton. And in their later years they resided at the Baptist Home. She died in February of 1988.  
Keathley, Lester (I43420035)
 
128 [This letter is written by Gustave Engelbrecbt to his Englebrect relatives in Missouri giving the details of the loss of his son Orville’s (spelled Orvel in the letter) wife and daughter in the Republic River Flood of May 31, 1935.]
Oxford, Nebraska
June 3, 1935

Dear Loved Ones:

Now that the rescue work is over I feel I should let you know more definite about the terrible flood we had here in the Republican Valley. The worst in the history of Nebraska. It his us all pretty bad but Dorothy and her family were some of those most severely hit.
The water came so fast that one couldn’t run out of the way of it, and it was midnight when the volley came and people were at sleep and the night was pitch dark and was raining some. When Dorothy and Orvel awoke, the water as coming into the house, they had no time to dress. Orvel waded through the water to get an axe and chop a hole in the roof; and all climbed to the roof when they got there the house swept away with them, going at a fast speed down the valley towards the river. In a little while the house hit something and went to pieces, and they went on with part of the roof. Soon they hit a tree at the river and were thrown into the river.
Orvel is a good swimmer, he took the little boy 2 years old in one arm and swam with the other arm. He told Dorothy to hang on to him she grabbed his suspenders and that way he swam with them. Poor Willis Lou had already gotten away from them. Soon they got on some floating pieces of something and held to that till they were wiped off that. Then he had to swim again and soon they got to something else to cling to but that soon got away from them and had to swim again. Somehow Dorothy must have hit something and lost her hold on him and sank. He saw her come up twice and hollered at her with all his might but she did not answer any more and sank again when he never saw her any more. In the excitement the boy dropped away from him he grabbed for him and happened to catch him by the arm, thanks to God, otherwise he would have been gone too. Being much discouraged after losing the girl 6 years old and finally Dorothy too, after swimming a mile and a half, but for the sake of the little boy he thought he hadto continue as long as his strength lasted, and he is a strong man.
Lucky he soon got to safety with the boy on a small, very small sandy island, soon after Dorothy let loose of him. If she had held on for about 20 feet more she would have been saved, but at the time they did not know that for it was too dark to see anything. They got to this island at about one o’clock at night and it was pretty cold and the little fellow had nothing on anymore, his shirt was all torn off and was quite bruised. Here he had to spend 36 hours before he was rescued.
The little fellow got so cold that he turned blue. Orvel took his overalls off and wrapped them around the boy and pressed him close to him. In the morning, Saturday, the sky was clear and the sun came out warm. But let me tell you Providence played its part here, God sure helped that little fellow. Orvel saw a little mattress floating on the water close to the shore he caught it and it was the boy’s own little mattress out of his little bed.
Orvel cut it open and dried it. Soon came a pillow along with an extra pillow case on it. Orvel put part of the feathers in the mattress and put the other pillowcase on him cutting a hole in the top for his head and a hole on each side for his arms and then put him in the mattress when he had that done the boy looked at his dad and smiled, that done him so well that he thought his efforts were well rewarded. In all this while the boy did not cry.

Orvel was so badly grieved over the loss of Dorothy and Willis Lou that he cried out loud for a long time. His little boy says to him, “Daddy shut up”.

36 hours is a long time for a little boy to do without food or water so he insisted on having some of that dirty floodwater. God helped him and soon came a cup floating along Orvel caught it and filled it with that water and left it settle until the dirt was all on the bottom then he drank the water off. Then he says, “Daddy lets call Mamma to make us some thing to eat. Orvel explained to him that mamma got lost in the water and would never come back. The little fellow must have understood that he never called for mamma again.

Not far away on another island Orvel saw a house he thought to swim over there with the boy, put him in the little pillow case and tied him on his back but the little fellow cried so bad that he had to abandon the scheme. Stayed till next morning, Sunday. Then he could wade it across to the house. The people that lived there had left everything and fled, but there was food and water in the house, so Orvel fixed a meal and it is needless to say the boy ate heartily and smiled.

At eleven o’clock a boat came along and saw them and brought them in. Today they are both doing well, only Orvel is horrible sun—burned and the boy is very sore. This is just one story of many similar ones. Many people were rescued from trees and housetops. Several of the rescuing party were drowned. Well I guess I must relate a little of our own experience. Since we all got out alive I did not think it so important though our loss is something like $3,000.00 We did not think the water would ever come as high as we live.

So we stayed in the house and went to bed at 11:30 a neighbor called for help the water was running in the basement. We got up and dressed in a hurry, and when we went out the water came into our yard already. We ran to see what could rescue from the basement but could do nothing the water was already running in and in a little while a minute or two the water stood a foot deep on the floor. We saw we had to flee but there too the water was so deep and too swift and none of us could swim. So we crawled outthe north window and got on the windmill tower and around the side of the tower we hung till next morning about eight o’clock, then the neighbors from the highland came and got us with horses. The water had dropped two feet or more already. This was Friday night.

Now, Monday, we have 15 men working to clean the dirt out of the house and barn. We had 2 feet of mud in the house when the water went down. Everything in the house was full of mud. All fences, hay lumber, posts and everything that would swim went away, some of the smaller buildings went too others were moved just some distance and were hung up. All spring chickens drowned. The bigger ones and old hens were roosting high and stayed. From 40 hogs have ten left, cattle were all gone but 4 but Saturday we heard where there were 5 more. The wheat oats are ruined and grain in the bin is full of mud, have not even got seed corn left. We had no corn planted yet in the bottom. It will probably be a few weeks before we can live on the place.

At Orville Fuchs’s place the old folks lived in a big 2 story house and had 8 occupants at the time. It swept away and all got drowned but 3. They clung to a tree. Every building on the place and everything else is gone. Orville hasn’t got anything anymore but he proved himself a brave man and a great hero and if Dorothy had just hung on to him a little bit longer he would have saved her too, but neither one knew that they were so near at safety. Nearly every house in low bottom is gone and many people are drowned. They have so far recovered 3 bodies. Dorothy and Willis Lou we have not found yet. We will search again tomorrow and pray that we may find them. We would feel so much better if we could find them.

Now Amanda will you please let Joe and Obergs read this letter for I just haven’t the time to write to every body and then send it to Bill and to Sister Emma. I would like so much to write to everyone but I just can’t find time we have so terrible much todo. Dear loved ones please forgive me, I am just all concerned in finding back my dear daughter and granddaughter meanwhile we will trust and pray and cast our burdens upon him who said, “Call upon me in the days of trouble and I will deliver thee I willwrite again as soon as I can. Wife is bearing up good and so are the rest, with the help of God.

Your loving ones,
Tena and I and the rest of the family

Note: After talking with Winnifred Watson I found out that the wife’s body was never recovered after the flood. Willis Lou’s body was found by a farmer who was tending to his fields and saw her little arm sticking up out of the ground where the floodwaters had receded.


 
Engelbrecht, Gustave F. (I10856368)
 
129 [This letter is written by Gustave Engelbrecbt to his Englebrect relatives in Missouri giving the details of the loss of his son Orville’s (spelled Orvel in the letter) wife and daughter in the Republic River Flood of May 31, 1935.]
Oxford, Nebraska
June 3, 1935

Dear Loved Ones:

Now that the rescue work is over I feel I should let you know more definite about the terrible flood we had here in the Republican Valley. The worst in the history of Nebraska. It his us all pretty bad but Dorothy and her family were some of those most severely hit.
The water came so fast that one couldn’t run out of the way of it, and it was midnight when the volley came and people were at sleep and the night was pitch dark and was raining some. When Dorothy and Orvel awoke, the water as coming into the house, they had no time to dress. Orvel waded through the water to get an axe and chop a hole in the roof; and all climbed to the roof when they got there the house swept away with them, going at a fast speed down the valley towards the river. In a little while the house hit something and went to pieces, and they went on with part of the roof. Soon they hit a tree at the river and were thrown into the river.
Orvel is a good swimmer, he took the little boy 2 years old in one arm and swam with the other arm. He told Dorothy to hang on to him she grabbed his suspenders and that way he swam with them. Poor Willis Lou had already gotten away from them. Soon they got on some floating pieces of something and held to that till they were wiped off that. Then he had to swim again and soon they got to something else to cling to but that soon got away from them and had to swim again. Somehow Dorothy must have hit something and lost her hold on him and sank. He saw her come up twice and hollered at her with all his might but she did not answer any more and sank again when he never saw her any more. In the excitement the boy dropped away from him he grabbed for him and happened to catch him by the arm, thanks to God, otherwise he would have been gone too. Being much discouraged after losing the girl 6 years old and finally Dorothy too, after swimming a mile and a half, but for the sake of the little boy he thought he hadto continue as long as his strength lasted, and he is a strong man.
Lucky he soon got to safety with the boy on a small, very small sandy island, soon after Dorothy let loose of him. If she had held on for about 20 feet more she would have been saved, but at the time they did not know that for it was too dark to see anything. They got to this island at about one o’clock at night and it was pretty cold and the little fellow had nothing on anymore, his shirt was all torn off and was quite bruised. Here he had to spend 36 hours before he was rescued.
The little fellow got so cold that he turned blue. Orvel took his overalls off and wrapped them around the boy and pressed him close to him. In the morning, Saturday, the sky was clear and the sun came out warm. But let me tell you Providence played its part here, God sure helped that little fellow. Orvel saw a little mattress floating on the water close to the shore he caught it and it was the boy’s own little mattress out of his little bed.
Orvel cut it open and dried it. Soon came a pillow along with an extra pillow case on it. Orvel put part of the feathers in the mattress and put the other pillowcase on him cutting a hole in the top for his head and a hole on each side for his arms and then put him in the mattress when he had that done the boy looked at his dad and smiled, that done him so well that he thought his efforts were well rewarded. In all this while the boy did not cry.

Orvel was so badly grieved over the loss of Dorothy and Willis Lou that he cried out loud for a long time. His little boy says to him, “Daddy shut up”.

36 hours is a long time for a little boy to do without food or water so he insisted on having some of that dirty floodwater. God helped him and soon came a cup floating along Orvel caught it and filled it with that water and left it settle until the dirt was all on the bottom then he drank the water off. Then he says, “Daddy lets call Mamma to make us some thing to eat. Orvel explained to him that mamma got lost in the water and would never come back. The little fellow must have understood that he never called for mamma again.

Not far away on another island Orvel saw a house he thought to swim over there with the boy, put him in the little pillow case and tied him on his back but the little fellow cried so bad that he had to abandon the scheme. Stayed till next morning, Sunday. Then he could wade it across to the house. The people that lived there had left everything and fled, but there was food and water in the house, so Orvel fixed a meal and it is needless to say the boy ate heartily and smiled.

At eleven o’clock a boat came along and saw them and brought them in. Today they are both doing well, only Orvel is horrible sun—burned and the boy is very sore. This is just one story of many similar ones. Many people were rescued from trees and housetops. Several of the rescuing party were drowned. Well I guess I must relate a little of our own experience. Since we all got out alive I did not think it so important though our loss is something like $3,000.00 We did not think the water would ever come as high as we live.

So we stayed in the house and went to bed at 11:30 a neighbor called for help the water was running in the basement. We got up and dressed in a hurry, and when we went out the water came into our yard already. We ran to see what could rescue from the basement but could do nothing the water was already running in and in a little while a minute or two the water stood a foot deep on the floor. We saw we had to flee but there too the water was so deep and too swift and none of us could swim. So we crawled outthe north window and got on the windmill tower and around the side of the tower we hung till next morning about eight o’clock, then the neighbors from the highland came and got us with horses. The water had dropped two feet or more already. This was Friday night.

Now, Monday, we have 15 men working to clean the dirt out of the house and barn. We had 2 feet of mud in the house when the water went down. Everything in the house was full of mud. All fences, hay lumber, posts and everything that would swim went away, some of the smaller buildings went too others were moved just some distance and were hung up. All spring chickens drowned. The bigger ones and old hens were roosting high and stayed. From 40 hogs have ten left, cattle were all gone but 4 but Saturday we heard where there were 5 more. The wheat oats are ruined and grain in the bin is full of mud, have not even got seed corn left. We had no corn planted yet in the bottom. It will probably be a few weeks before we can live on the place.

At Orville Fuchs’s place the old folks lived in a big 2 story house and had 8 occupants at the time. It swept away and all got drowned but 3. They clung to a tree. Every building on the place and everything else is gone. Orville hasn’t got anything anymore but he proved himself a brave man and a great hero and if Dorothy had just hung on to him a little bit longer he would have saved her too, but neither one knew that they were so near at safety. Nearly every house in low bottom is gone and many people are drowned. They have so far recovered 3 bodies. Dorothy and Willis Lou we have not found yet. We will search again tomorrow and pray that we may find them. We would feel so much better if we could find them.

Now Amanda will you please let Joe and Obergs read this letter for I just haven’t the time to write to every body and then send it to Bill and to Sister Emma. I would like so much to write to everyone but I just can’t find time we have so terrible much todo. Dear loved ones please forgive me, I am just all concerned in finding back my dear daughter and granddaughter meanwhile we will trust and pray and cast our burdens upon him who said, “Call upon me in the days of trouble and I will deliver thee I willwrite again as soon as I can. Wife is bearing up good and so are the rest, with the help of God.

Your loving ones,
Tena and I and the rest of the family

Note: After talking with Winnifred Watson I found out that the wife’s body was never recovered after the flood. Willis Lou’s body was found by a farmer who was tending to his fields and saw her little arm sticking up out of the ground where the floodwaters had receded.
 
Engelbrecht, Dorothy Marie (I43760472)
 
130 1 Source
Marriage to Laura Selane "Lane" WILLIAMS
1878
13 Oct
Age: 20
Madison, Missouri, USA

Residence
1880
Age: 23
Twelve-Mile, Madison, Missouri, United States

Death
1883
22 Oct
Age: 26
Trace Creek, Madison, Missouri
Missouri Death Records, 1834-1910 Name: George Lewis Death Date: 22 Oct 1883 Birth Date: abt 1857 County: Madison Death Location: Trace Creek Madison County, MO Race/Ethnicity: White Age: 26 Gender: M cause of death; pneumonia

Burial
Griffin Farm Cemetery, Madison, Missouri
Griffin Farm cemetery - Madison County, Missouri cemeteries - Lewis, George 1857 22 Oct 1883 S/O John Lewis Jr & Nancy Berry H/O Laurie Selane Williams (NOTE: I beleive birth date is an error, census consistanly him older than brother James) 
Lewis, George E. (I74762230)
 
131 12 Feb 1846
Birth
Tennessee, USA

1850
Age: 4
Residence
Madison, Missouri

1860
Age: 14
Residence
Liberty, Iron, Missouri, United States

1870
Age: 24
Residence
Township 32 Range 3 East, Iron, Missouri, United States

1880
Age: 34
Residence
Logan, Reynolds, Missouri, United States
living with Thomas and Elisabeth Dickson (Elizabeth Chitwood Dickson, dau of William and Cecelia Whitecotton/W-Cotton Chitwood)

1881
9 Aug
Age: 35

Marriage to China CHITWOOD
Reynolds, Missouri
Missouri Marriage Records, 1805-2002 Name: Eli Lewis Marriage Date: 9 Aug 1881 Marriage Location: Reynolds, Missouri Spouse Name: China Chitwood

1900
Age: 54
Residence
Logan Township (South Half), Reynolds, Missouri

1910
Age: 64
Residence
North Logan, Reynolds, Missouri

1920
Age: 74
Residence
Logan, Reynolds, Missouri

1930
22 Jan
Age: 83

Death
Reynolds, Missouri, USA

1930
25 Jan

Burial
Bethleham Cemetery, Reynolds, Missouri
findagrave.com
 
Lewis, Eli (I72478916)
 
132 12th District Cocke Co Tenn#139--William Gilliland 8/5/1824. Corner to Robert Gilliland, corner to JOHN DENTON, JAMES LILLARD 140 WILLIAM GILLILAND 12 ACRES State of Tennessee Cocke CountyBy Virtue of an entry made in the entry takers office for the aforesaid county of Cocke of No. 251 dated the fifth day of August 1824 I have surveyed for WILLIAM GILLILAND twelve acres of land on the water of little fork of Cosby Creek Beginning at a white walnut on the bank of the creek corner to ROBERT GILLILAND thence with his line south seventy five and one fourth east twenty two poles to Iron Wood stump corner to JOHN DENTONS old survey then with the same north four East thirty seven poles to an elm North seventy two Eat thirty nine poles to a buckeye stump North seventyWest crossing the creek twelve poles to a sycamore xxxxxx West twenty poles to a stake then south sixty one and a half West forty seven poles to a stake on or near DEVERS[?] line then with or nearly with ditto a direct line to the beginning. Having such form as represented by the above Platt. Surveyed 16th day of November 1824JAMES LILLARD)

By Jonathan Wood
Surveyor of Cocke County

DAVID LEWIS
C.C.

304JOHN LILLARD 125 ACRESState of Tennessee Cocke County.By virtue of an entry made in the entry takers office of said county at Newport of NO. 388 dated the 2nd day of January 1826. for one hundred and forty five acres. I have surveyed for JOHN LILLARD one hundred and twenty five acres it being bounded so no more could be had. Beginning at a sourwood on his own line running thence with the same north fifty six and one fourth west thirty eight poles to JOHN DENTONS corner south eighteen west twenty and one fourth poles to a white oak north seventy five and one fourth west two poles to a stake corner to Robert Gilliland then with his line sixty and one fourth poles to a gum south sixty and one fourth poles to a gum south eighty one west crossing the publicroad at twenty poles in all thirty poles to a small black oak south eighty six East forty two poles to a small black oak and maple on JOHN ALLENS line then with ditto north thirty seven and one half east sixty six poles to a white oak his corner south fifty two east eighty six poles to a black oak same course continued seventy four poles to a stake corner near HUFFS line north one hundred poles to a stake north twenty two west forty five poles to a sourwood corner to ABR DENTON then with his line to the beginning.James Allen)

Jon. Wood
Surveyor of Cocke County

James Rose
C.C.
 
Family F17484164
 
133 15 Jul 1893
Birth
Gasconade county, Missouri

Residence
1900
Age: 7
Boeuf, Gasconade, Missouri

Residence
1910
Age: 17
Boeuf, Gasconade, Missouri

Residence
1917
Age: 24
Gasconade county, Missouri
World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918

Residence
1920
Age: 27
Lyon, Franklin, Missouri

Residence
1920
Age: 27
Boeuf, Gasconade, Missouri

Death
1979
Jan
Age: 85
Ballwin, Saint Louis county, Missouri 
Hesemann, Oscar Julius (I21296808)
 
134 15 May 1745
DE Land Record between George Fleming and Archibald Fleming

12 May 1763
DE Land Rec: between Solomon Eagle of Queen Anns Co MD & Syarh his wife ~ George Fleming of County of Kent on Delaware yeoman ~ 150 acres land South west branch of Murtheskill [Murderkill?] Creek, Mispillion Hundred. 27 Dec 1762 also on record
7 Aug 1772
Kent County, Delaware, USA
DE Land Records: 7 Aug 1772 George Fleming Kent Co DE & Margaret his wife and William Tharp. Stmt by Margret Fleming that she made decision on her own without coersion.
 
Fleming, George Jr. (I34533188)
 
135 17 Jul 1885
Saco, Madison, Missouri
birth on WWI registration, death cert shows Saco, Missouri

Residence
1900
Age: 15
Twelve Mile Township, Madison, Missouri

Marriage to Elizabeth "Lizzie" PLIGHT
1915
7 Sep
Age: 30
Madison, Missouri, USA

1920
Age: 35
Castor, Madison, Missouri

Marriage to Virginia Helen "Virgie" WRAY
1924
ABT
Age: 39

Residence
1930
Age: 45
Liberty, Madison, Missouri

Burial:
MILLER CEMETERY, Madison Co., MO
(Also known as “Green’s Chapel Cemetery)
Location: Hiway 67 S, West on Hiway C, Cross
St. Francois River Bridge at Dug Hill & Turn Right
Follow River Road #431 approx 3.5 Miles Left Side of Hill
Owned by: Ed Miller. May want to get permission.

*Lewis, Infant C/O Robert Lee Lewis & Lizzie Plight
*Lewis, Lizzie 1st wife of Robert Lee Lewis (nee Plight)
Lewis, Robert Lee Jul. 1885-27 Apr. 1855 S/O Robert Lewis & Salaine Williams 
Lewis, Robert Lee (I11252728)
 
136 18 Mar 1829
Birth
Prob. Cocke, Tennessee

1850
Age: 21

Residence
District 76, Reynolds, Missouri

1850
abt
Age: 21
Marriage to Kesiah "Kizzie" CHITWOOD
Missouri, USA
1853 -1854
Age: 24

Death
Missouri
died before the 1860 census

1853
Age: 24
Circuit County Court records
Madison, Missouri, United States
1853 Lewis,
1879
28 Sep
Alexander Lewis's sons sell Jacob Lewis's land
Reynolds, Missouri
William W and Jacob Lewis sold the land of Jacob Lewis to Martin B Chitwood, that documents Alexander to Jacob Lewis as a son 
Lewis, Alexander (I97072384)
 
137 1807
Birth
possibly the Carolina's or Tennessee

ABT 1828
Age: 21
Marriage to Jacob LEWIS
Tennessee, USA

1 Apr 1843
Age: 36
Big Creek Baptist Church
Big Creek, Madison, Missouri
1 Apr 1843 - Big Creek Baptist Church Organized: RANDOLPH & BIDDY LANE along with Joseph Reuble, Jacob Lewis, Stacy Ruble, Christina Woolford, Roley Ann Lewis (Polly Ann? ns)& Elizabeth Sutten at the house of RANDOLPH LANE on Big Creek.

1850 May
Age: 43
Death
Madison, Missouri
the 28th of August 1850, daughter Emiline shows 3/12 months old, her birth is May 1850. family traditon shown by descendant Lelia Anderson says that Polly died at the birth of her last child, Emiline Caroline Lewis
 
Martin, Mary "Polly" Ann (I33227017)
 
138 1810 - David Jay sells to Benjamin Luas - book D page 124-125 Buncombe County, NC

 
Lewis, Benjamin (I40853204)
 
139 1814
ABT
Birth
North Carolina

1834
Age: 20
Marriage to Nancy HATFIELD
probably Marion County, Tennessee
1850
Age: 36

Residence
Madison, Missouri

1853
1 Aug
Age: 39

Land Grant
Madison, Missouri
40 acres

1853
1 Aug
Age: 39

Land Grant
Madison, Missouri
40 acres

1854
15 Nov
Age: 40

Land Grant
Madison, Missouri
80 acres

1854
15 Nov
Age: 40

Land Grant
Madison, Missouri
40 acres

1856
3 Jan
Age: 42

Land Grant
Madison, Missouri
80 acres

1856
16 Jun
Age: 42

Land Grant
Madison, Missouri
"two hundred & thirty nine acres & sixty seven hundredths of an acre"

1857
8 Apr
Age: 43
Land
Madison, Missouri
David & Nancy Louis, John and Eliza Jane Wallace "Oliver Lewis 40 acres) to Valentine C Peers & Zebulon Murphy -Iron County was created from Madison in 1857

1857
16 Sep
Age: 43

Land
Madison, Missouri
David and Nancy Lewis to Joseph Bollinger - Iron County was created from Madison in 1857 -" land he had bought from George Lewis and wife, by deed dated March 13 1857"

1860
Age: 46

Residence
Pierce, Stone, Missouri
Photos (1)

1861
abt
Age: 47
Death
Collin, Texas, USA
for the account of David, his move to Texas and his death - note memoirs written by Grandaughter, Belle Lewis Behringer- daughter of George W and Mary McPeeters Lewis. Belle beleived David died of exposure, other accounts said "hiccups" 
Lewis, David Wesley (I96759238)
 
140 1814
abt
Birth
Tennessee
findagrave.com shows May 20, 1827
5 source citations
1850
Age: 36
Residence
District 76, Reynolds, Missouri
1 source citation
1860
Age: 46
Residence
Union, Iron, Missouri, United States
1 source citation
1870
Age: 56
Residence
Saint Francois, Wayne, Missouri, United States
1 source citation
1880
Age: 66
Residence
Saint Francis, Wayne, Missouri, United States
1 source citation
1888
3 Sep
Age: 74
Death
Greene County, Arkansas, USA
Burial
Pine Knott Cemetery, Greene, Arkansas
Cemetery notes say W/o John P Lane , findagrave.com 
Gilliland, Hefhziba "Hepsey" Mary (I39620240)
 
141 1818 Arsenal Leimbach, Rudolph Heinrich (I77565824)
 
142 1820 Census :
Name James McMinn
Age 72
Birth Year abt 1778
Birthplace North Carolina
Home in 1850 Hickman, Tennessee, USA
Gender Male
Family Number928
Household Members
Name Age
James McMinn 72
Elizabeth McMinn 64
Jessie McMinn 22
Mary McMinn 21

Name James McMinn
Age82
Birth Yea rabt 1778
Gender Male
Birth Place North Carolina
Home in 1860 District 5, Hickman, Tennessee
Dwelling Number1001
Family Number1001
Occupation Retired & Gentleman
Real Estate Value 1500
Household Members
Name Age
James McMinn
Elizabeth McMinn
 
McMinn, James Robert (I36151698)
 
143 1820 Census: Place: Peterstown, Monroe, ;Virginia; Roll: M33_133; Page: 177; Image: 216. Miller, John Wert (I2644088)
 
144 1822
18 May
Birth
Tennessee
5 source citations
1850
Age: 28
Residence
District 76, Reynolds, Missouri
1 source citation
1860
Age: 38
Residence
Union, Iron, Missouri, United States
1 source citation
1870
Age: 48
Residence
Saint Francois, Wayne, Missouri, United States
1 source citation
1880
Age: 58
Residence
Saint Francis, Wayne, Missouri, United States
1 source citation
1880
Age: 58
Residence
Saint Francis, Wayne, Missouri, United States
1 source citation
1899
30 Jan
Age: 76
Death
Greene County, Arkansas, USA
Burial
Pine Knot Cemetery, Greene, Arkansas
findagrave.com 
Family F95305600
 
145 1823
23 Oct
Birth
Chester, South Carolina
info from findagrave.com
3 source citations
1843
abt
Age: 20
Marriage to Maria (LEWIS?) (Lane?)
Missouri
1850
Age: 27
Residence
Madison, Missouri
1 source citation
1853
1 Nov
Age: 30
Land Grant
Madison, Missouri
Edward Robbs Military Land Grant for service in the War of 1812 assigned to Elihue Dunn (Iron was created from Madison County in 1857)
Stories (1)
1854
15 Nov
Age: 31
Land Grant
Iron, Missouri
40 acres
Stories (1)
1854
15 Nov
Age: 31
Land Grant
Iron, Missouri
40 acres - 2nd 40 acre - 15 Nov 1854
Stories (1)
1856
16 Jun
Age: 32
Land Grant
Iron, Missouri
80 acres
Stories (1)
1857
7 Apr
Age: 33
Land
Madison, Missouri
John and Emeline Dunn, Elihue and Mariah Dunn, John and Helen Dunn, Eliab and Winey Dunn, Leroy and Sarah Dunn & Mary Dunn to Andrew J. Vance- Iron County was created from Madison in 1857
Stories (1)
1858
1 Dec
Age: 35
Land Grant
Iron, Missouri
80 acres
1860
Age: 37
Residence
Liberty, Iron, Missouri, United States
1 source citation
1862
1 Feb
Age: 38

Oath of Loyalty
Ironton, Iron, Missouri
"Oath of Loyality to defend the Constitution and Government"
Photos (2)
1864
28 Apr
Age: 40
Marriage to Margaret Elvira SMITH
Iron, Missouri
Groom's Name: Elihu Dunn Bride's Name: Margaret E. Pinkley Marriage Date: 28 Apr 1864 Marriage Place: Iron,Missouri
1870
3 Jul
Age: 46
Residence
Township 32 Range 3 East, Iron, Missouri, United States  
Dunn, Elihue (I46538309)
 
146 1836 Marion County Tax List
copied by Euline Harris from Microfilm
District 1
Richard Austin, William Brown, James Byars, Warren Butler, James Brown, James Bunch, James Baumgard, John Bowman, John Coffin, Adam Clement ?, George W Cain, James Cannon, Hugh Colston, Pleasant Cooper, David Cordele?, James Cagle, William Cooper, James Deakins, John Deakins, W. Dorough, Thomas Dodson, Absalom Deakins, Joseph Elliott, William Elliott, James Ewton, Thomas Earle, James Farmer, James Goodinar, Reuben Green, John Grayson, Benjamin Grayson, Hugh Grayson, Amos Griffith, Spencer Hatfield, Martin Heard, John Henson, Hiram Hatfield, Jehu Heard, Andrew Hatfield, Nathan Hatfield, Gilbert Hatfield, Isaac Johnson, Malcomb Nathaniel Johnson, Hiram Johnson, David Jones, Allen Kirklin, Hugh Lamb, Benjamin Looney, Mathew Gott, Benjamin Lewis, Randolph Lewis, Jacob Lewis, Johnny Lasaster , George Lewis, Charles Mooney, Lewis Matthews, Robert Mansfield, Joseph McClure, Benjamin Neighbors, Daniel Pitman, Matthew Phelps, William Phelps, Stephen Richard, William Rankin, Mongomery Robert, Harry Richards, Marcellius Smith, Isaac Stone, Richard Shockly, Sam Smith, Ransom Smith, William Stewart, James Stewart, Daniel Sparger, George Stewart, Edward Seaborn?, Jehu Savage, Lallban Suthorn, Hampton Tasket, John Taylor, Joel Walker, John Walker, Joseph Watson, F Warren, Meredith Webb, John Williams, Thomas Webb, Natly Warren, Allan Gray, Haniforth Hatfield, William Henson, and William Smith.

District 2
Josiah Anderson, Charles Atkinson, Benjamin Ahl, James Allen, Thomas Bennett, George Bennett, Sam Bennett, John Berry, John Barker, William Barker, Howell Barker, James Brummit, Lindsey G Brown, James Barker, James Bunch, David Choudoin, James Condra, Alfred Carlton, Jephu Crouch, John Carmack, Jacob Carlton, Fountain Davis, Joshua Easterly, Moses Easterly, John Farmer, Andrew Farmer, William Farmer, A Farmer, John Frederick, Hezekiah Frederick, John Frederick Jr, Henry Frederick, Thomas Golston, Milton Eake, ?? Gass, John Griffith, James Gray, William Gott, Matthew Griffith, Joseph Gibbons, Claiborne Gott, Samuel Gott, Isaac Hick, Elijah Hick, William Hutcherson, Jephu Hunter, Gabriel Hendrix, John Hackworth, William Holloway, Bird Hicks, Delany Herron, Lewis Hendrix, G Hatfield, John Hopkins, Shaw Hustin, E Jones, William Kelly, Alexander Kelly, Joseph Kelly, Robert Kell, Allan Kirklin, John Kell, William Lasater, Thomas Land, Nathaniel Langley, Gilbert Lee, Berry Lee, Benjamin Lewis, Matthew Gott, John Medley, Thomas Martin, John Major, Richard Mitchell, Isaac Neighbors, Crawford Powell, John Pickett, Jephu Pickett, Albert Pankey, James Rogers, William Russell, Dauswell Rogers, David Stewart, Gross Scruggs, William Smith, Gilliam Shelton, Laton Smith, William Smith, James Tygart, Robert Teague, Ephraim Thurman, Henry Tatum, Lusfield? Wimberly, Daniel White, Abraham White, James Weaver, Henry Watson, and Henry Yarnell. 
Lewis, Benjamin (I40853204)
 
147 1836, 1839 Early Tax List Bedford County, TN

1848 Mississippi Homestead Patent
 
Haile, Alexander (I40951016)
 
148 1837
Birth
Tennessee, USA

1850
Age: 13
Residence
Scattering, Marion, Tennessee

1852
Age: 15
Marriage to John LEWIS
prob. Marion, Tennessee, USA
1860
Age: 23
Residence
Liberty, Iron, Missouri, United States

1870
Age: 33
Residence
Township 31 Range 3 East, Iron, Missouri, United States

1880
Age: 43
Residence
Twelve-Mile, Madison, Missouri, United States

1883
Age: 46
Death
Missouri, USA
Burial
Mt. Pisgah Cemetery, Madison, Missouri  
Berry, Nancy Sarah (I54332493)
 
149 1840 Federal Census listings:
unknown twp., Madison Co., MO:
King, Samuel: 3 m. 0-5, 1 m. 10-15, 1 m. 20-30, 1 m. 40-50, 1 f. 0-5, 1 f. 30-40
p. 231, unknown twp., Wayne Co., MO:
King, Nancy: 1 m. 5-10, 1 m. 10-15, 1 m. 15-20, 2 f. 5-10, 1 f. 10-15 
King, James (I67569628)
 
150 1840 State of Missouri Lemons, Samuel & Isaac; Brewer, W. Riot / Assault on Eliab Dunn - from Notha Stevens Dunn, Eliab (I60105066)
 

      «Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 68» Next»